Guacamole

Guacamole

Difficulty Rating: 2/10
Time Taken: 15 minutes
Serves: 6-8


It doesn’t get much better than warm tortilla chips and freshly mashed guacamole. Once you’ve made it yourself you’ll never go back to the store-bought version, and as well as losing all the additives, stabilizers and extra sodium found in ready-made guac, you’ll get to pick exactly how yours tastes; and I guarantee it will be better.

Like it a bit creamier? Go ahead! Prefer double the amount of jalapeño in yours? Nobody’s going to stop you. I first learned this recipe from my wife, so plenty of credit is due there, but we often mix up some of the ingredients each time we make it.

Ingredients

  • 4 ripe-to-overripe avocados - the softer the better, here
  • 1 red pepper (poblano or classic bell)
  • 1-2 tbsp pickled jalapeños (depending on your spice tolerance)
  • 1-2 tbsp pickled jalapeño juice (depending on your liquidity preference)
  • A handful of fresh cilantro/coriander, leaves only
  • 2 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • Salt
  • 1 clove garlic

Method

The first order of business is to prep your aromatics. You want to do this before opening your avocados, as once they’re cut open oxidation will begin and if you leave it too late, they’ll start to turn brown and lose their fresh green hue.

Start by crushing or finely chopping your clove of garlic, finely chop your cilantro/coriander, and dice your red pepper into chunks/cubes of your preferred size. I tend to go for smaller pieces, but it’s totally up to you. Next, cut up your pickled jalapeños, again in the size you want.

Combine the chopped ingredients in a bowl, along with the red pepper flakes, and then add your ripe avocados. The easiest way to do this is to run a knife longways around the avocado from top to bottom; once you’ve traced the whole way around, grab each side and gently twist and pull. A ripe avocado will easily fall into two pieces, and then you can remove the stone with a spoon or (a bit more cheffy) by carefully hitting it with a long, sharp knife and lifting it out. Spoon all that green goodness into your bowl of chopped aromatics.

At this point, you may want to start adding a little bit of your liquid to help bind the fresh ingredients, and stop further oxidation of your avocado. Add half of your lime juice and 1tbsp of jalapeño juice. 

You’re now ready to begin binding, and there are many different ways to do this. Some people use a potato masher, others a mortar and pestle, some the back of a spoon. I like to use a fork, as it allows me to carefully break down just the right amount of avocado so I can retain a few chunky pieces. Ultimately, this part is entirely up to how you like your guac. Go longer for a smoother and creamier version, or less for a thicker and chunkier style.

Once you’ve reached the consistency you like, add salt to taste, as well as additional lime juice and jalapeño juice to your preference. Just be cautious that adding more juice will naturally thin the dip, so if you take anything from this recipe, it should be to taste taste taste as you go along!

That’s it. Store your guac in the fridge in an airtight tupperware box to keep it green and fresh for longer, and it will keep for as long as a week if you’re able to keep your hands off it!

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